Table 1. Traffic crashes, traffic crash fatalities, and alcohol-related traffic crash fatalities1, United States, 1982–2004.
Year Event
Traffic crashes Traffic crash fatalities (a) Alcohol-related traffic crash fatalities (b) Percent alcohol-related traffic crash fatalities (b/a)
2004 38,444 42,836 16,919 39.5
2003 38,477 42,884 17,105 39.9
2002 38,491 43,005 17,524 40.7
2001 37,862 42,196 17,400 41.2
2000 37,526 41,945 17,380 41.4
1999 37,140 41,717 16,572 39.7
1998 37,107 41,501 16,673 40.2
1997 37,324 42,013 16,711 39.8
1996 37,494 42,065 17,749 42.2
1995 37,241 41,817 17,732 42.4
1994 36,254 40,716 17,308 42.5
1993 35,780 40,150 17,908 44.6
1992 34,942 39,250 18,290 46.6
1991 36,937 41,508 20,159 48.6
1990 39,836 44,599 22,587 50.6
1989 40,741 45,582 22,423 49.2
1988 42,130 47,087 23,833 50.6
1987 41,438 46,390 24,093 51.9
1986 41,090 46,087 25,017 54.3
1985 39,195 43,825 23,166 52.9
1984 39,631 44,257 24,761 55.9
1983 37,976 42,589 24,634 57.8
1982 39,092 43,945 26,172 59.6

1   A crash is considered as alcohol-related if either a driver or a nonoccupant (pedestrian or pedalcyclist) had ablood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.01 g/dl or greater. When alcohol tests were not done or test results are unknown, imputed BAC data provided by NHTSA are used.

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