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Home » Publications » Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Reference Manuals

U.S. Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Reference Manuals

Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Reference Manuals are statistical compendiums of alcohol-related data useful to researchers and others interested in alcohol problems. The recent manuals include alcohol-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations, alcohol use and alcohol use disorders in the United States and a 3-Year follow-up, State trends in drinking behaviors, alcohol consumption and problems in the general population, drinking in the United States, State trends in apparent per capita alcohol consumption, State trends in alcohol-related mortality, and county-level estimates of alcohol-related mortality. PDF files are available for manual volumes 3, 5, 6, 8 and 9; and machine-readable data files are available for volumes 1, 3 and 5 from the links provided below on this page. Electronic files for other volumes can be requested from the Alcohol Epidemiologic Data System (AEDSinfor@csrincorporated.com)

The manuals can be ordered by either writing to NIAAA or ordering online.

Alcohol-Related Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations and Their Co-Occurring Drug-Related, Mental Health, and Injury Conditions in the United States: Findings from the 2006–2010 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) and Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Reference Manual, Volume 9, September 2013, NIH Publications No. 13-8000.

This is the first manual to present national statistics on alcohol-related morbidity that covers both emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Based on the two largest multiyear all-payer databases, the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), this manual provides a more complete picture of health care utilization for alcohol-related health problems in the United States. The data tables present short trends in ED visits and hospitalization rates from 2006 to 2010 for various specific alcohol-related diagnoses. These include alcoholic psychoses, alcohol dependence syndrome, nondependent abuse of alcohol, chronic liver diseases and cirrhosis, and alcohol poisoning, as well as their co-occurring drug-related, mental health–related, and injury-related diagnoses.

All data from this manual can be found in one file: NEDS&NIS-DRM9 [PDF]


Alcohol Use and Alcohol Use Disorders in the United States, A 3-Year Follow-Up: Main Findings from the 2004–2005 Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Reference Manual, Volume 8, Number 2, September 2010, NIH Publications No. 10-7677.

In 2004–2005, NIAAA conducted the second wave of NESARC, following up on the same respondents from the 2001–2002 Wave 1 NESARC. This manual presents main findings from the Wave 2 NESARC, focusing on changes during the 3-year period between the two waves among the 2001–2002 baseline population. These include changes in alcohol consumption behaviors, recovery status from alcohol use disorders, first incidence rates for alcohol use disorders and other related mental and health conditions, and changes in quality of life scores. Data are presented, in table form, for various subpopulation groups defined by baseline characteristics. To facilitate inter-group comparisons, standard errors are provided for all estimates.

All data from this manual can be found in one file: NESARC2DRM [PDF]


Alcohol Use and Alcohol Use Disorders in the United States: Main Findings from the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Reference Manual, Volume 8, Number 1, January 2006, NIH Publications No. 05-5737.

This manual is a compilation of detailed statistical data from the NIAAA 2001-2002 NESARC, conducted via household interviews with a nationally representative sample of 43,093 respondents ages 18 and older. The manual presents information, in table form, on the prevalence and patterns of alcohol use, DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence, family history of alcoholism, problems associated with alcohol, alcoholism treatment, drug and nicotine use disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, personality and conduct disorders, pathological gambling, and a number of alcohol-related physical conditions. Data are presented according to selected respondent characteristics. To facilitate inter-group comparisons, standard errors are provided for all estimates.

All data from this manual can be found in one file: NESARC-DRM [PDF]


U.S. Apparent Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages Based on State Sales, Taxation, or Receipt Data. U.S. Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Reference Manual, Volume 1, Fourth Edition, June 2004, NIH Publication No. 04-5563.

This manual presents detailed State, regional, and national trends in per capita consumption of ethanol for each year from 1970 through 2000. Data are collected from individual States or beverage industry sources. The per capita estimates are based on the population ages 14 years and older. Trends in per capita ethanol consumption for the nation, the four Census regions, and the individual States and the District of Columbia are provided for beer, wine, spirits, and all alcoholic beverages combined. A series of line graphs and maps present trends and comparisons for individual States by beverage type. State population estimates both on persons age 14 years and older and on persons age 21 years and older are provided for researchers to facilitate further research. Appendix B in the reference manual describes the sources and limitations of the data.

All data from this manual can be found in one file: pcyr1970-2009.txt


State Trends in Drinking Behaviors, 1984-2001. U.S. Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Reference Manual, Volume 7, First Edition, June 2003, NIH Publication No. 02-5213.

This manual presents State prevalence estimates using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for drinking status and drinking level (non-drinker, and light, moderate, and heavier drinker based on alcohol use in the past month); 5+ drinks (having 5 or more drinks on a single occasion 1 or more times in the past month); and drinking and driving (operating a motor vehicle after having too much to drink 1 or more times in the past month). The prevalence estimates are presented by State and year according to sex, age, race, Hispanic origin, education, marital status and employment status. Standard errors are provided to help users compare and test for statistically significant differences between estimates over time or across States.


Alcohol Consumption and Problems in the General Population: Findings From the 1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey, June 2002, NIH Publication No. 02-4997.

This compilation of findings brings together in a single volume more than 40 articles based on the 1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES). This nationally representative household survey was designed and sponsored by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; fieldwork was conducted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Interviews were held with 42,862 adults (18 years of age and older) living in the contiguous United States and the District of Columbia. Findings based on the NLAES interviews have been published in a wide range of peer-reviewed journals over the last eight years. These articles are presented in their entirety and are grouped into 11 key topics.


Drinking in the United States: Main Findings from the 1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES). U.S. Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Reference Manual, Volume 6, First Edition, November 1998, NIH Publication No. 99-3519.

This manual includes detailed data on current drinkers from the 1992 NLAES. Percent distribution tables on 20 drinking variables, e.g., drinking status in the last year, DSM-IV alcohol disorders, age of starting to drink, family history of alcoholism, specific alcoholic beverage preference, drinking after driving, and alcohol treatment, are presented according to selected respondent characteristics. These include sex, age, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, education, currently employed full-time, personal annual income, current/most recent occupation, current/most recent industry, ever raised children and children under 14 living in household. To facilitate inter-group comparisons, standard errors for the percent distributions are provided for all estimates.

An Adobe Acrobat version of this manual is available from this site in four parts: (1) nlaesdrm.pfd [109KB]; (2) table1.pdf [719KB]; (3) table2.pdf [135KB]; and (4) table3.pdf [33KB]. Please examine the first file (nlaesdrm.pdf) to decide which of the other three files you also wish to obtain. You must download all files to obtain the entire data reference manual.


State Trends in Alcohol-Related Mortality, 1979-92. U.S. Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Reference Manual, Volume 5, First Edition, September 1996, NIH Publication No. 96-4174.

This manual presents trends in alcohol-related mortality from 1979 through 1992. State tables for each of the 50 States and the District of Columbia present the number of alcohol-related deaths and unadjusted and age-adjusted death rates per 100,000 population for three major categories of alcohol-related mortality. These major categories include causes of death with explicit mention of alcohol, other alcohol-related diseases, and other alcohol-related injuries or adverse effects. The State data tables also include the number of deaths and death rates for all chronic liver disease and cirrhosis. Table 2 provides further detail for specific alcohol-related causes of death, including all cirrhosis, alcoholic liver cirrhosis, specified liver cirrhosis without mention of alcohol, unspecified liver cirrhosis without mention of alcohol, non-dependent abuse of alcohol, alcohol dependence syndrome, accidental poisoning by alcohol, and alcoholic psychosis.

Adobe Acrobat version of this manual is available from this site in one part: alcdth96.pdf [515KB]

All data from Table 1 in this manual can be found in one file: sarm7992.txt


County Alcohol Problem Indicators 1986-1990. U.S. Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Reference Manual, Volume 3, Fourth Edition, July 1994, NIH Publication No.94-3747.

This manual presents State-level and county-level unadjusted and age-adjusted alcohol related death rates per 100,000 population for the five-year period from 1986 through 1990. Also included are population estimates that can be used for calculating actual number of deaths for each State and county. Major categories include: causes of death with explicit mention of alcohol; other alcohol-related diseases; other alcohol-related injuries or adverse effects; and all alcohol-related deaths. For each category of cause of death there are also ranks for States and ranks for counties within each State.

An Adobe Acrobat version of this manual is available from this site in three parts: (1) cntmrt94.pdf [461KB]; (2) cntymap1.pdf [1,721KB]; and (3) cntymap2.pdf [1,628KB]. The first file contains the entire document except for 20 pages of county-level maps. These map pages are available in the much larger second and third files for those who want the entire contents of this data reference manual.

Data from this manual can be found in four files: (1) sdatauna.txt contains State-level unadjusted death rates; (2) sdataadj.txt contains State-level age-adjusted death rates; (3) cdatauna.txt contains county-level unadjusted death rates; and (4) cdataadj.txt contains county-level age-adjusted death rates.


Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Directory / Surveillance Reports

ORDERING INFORMATION

U.S. Alcohol Epidemiologic Data Reference Manuals

Copies may be ordered by either writing to NIAAA or ordering online.

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NIAAA
P.O. Box 10686
Rockville, MD 20849-0686
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Updated: September 2013